Electric cars with a 200 mile range

Travel from London to Birmingham and back on a single charge: electric cars with a 200 mile range

John Evans
Nov 16, 2021

Electric cars that can travel over 200 miles on a single charge are now a reality. At a stroke, they promise to remove the range anxiety associated with electric cars and the fear of running out of power, while opening up the possibility of travelling from London to Birmingham and back without needing to plug in.

Not all of these cars are expensive premium models, either. The cheapest are around £30,000, but are also available for less as used cars. That's not to say there are no expensive options - it's possible to spend over £100,000 on some electric cars that can do more than 300 miles.

For electric vehicles like the Kia e-Niro, 200 miles is just the start: their battery packs store enough electricity to power them for 250 miles in real-world conditions (although this is only an average and will reduce in extremely cold weather or at high speeds).

We've quoted each car's real-world range, drawn from testing by BuyaCar and its sister publications, as well as the official figure that's quoted in brochures and advertising. This official range is calculated during a standard laboratory test, which has recently been updated to be more accurate, reducing the discrepancy between official and realistic range. All electric cars on this page have undergone the new test, apart from Teslas, which explains the larger gap between the two quoted ranges.

Electric cars with 200-mile range

1. Nissan Leaf e+

Official range 239 miles
Used deals Limited stock

A longer-range version of the Nissan Leaf called the Leaf e+ brought some interior upgrades and a much larger battery claimed to increase range by 71 miles over the smaller version. This means there is now a Leaf capable of travelling more than 200 miles on a single charge. Maybe surprisingly, this version with the heavier battery is more efficient than the 40kWh version, meaning more miles per kWh.

It's more expensive from new but used versions have become somewhat more affordable. Look for models with Nissan's partially autonomous ProPilot driver assistance system, which can accelerate, brake and steer the car on motorways - but still requires the driver to have their hands on the wheel, and to be in a position to take over at any time.

NISSAN LEAF BUYERS' GUIDE

2. Kia e-Niro

Official range 282 miles
Used deals from £31,160
Monthly finance from £0*

The eNiro offers a practical real-world range for at least half the price of the premium cars elsewhere in this list. It’s a practical SUV with a well-shaped 451-litre boot, and comfortable and conventionally styled with it. Depending on which version you go for, there is plenty of equipment too, including heated seats, a reversing camera, and adaptive cruise control.

KIA NIRO BUYERS' GUIDE

3. Hyundai Kona Electric

Official range up to 279 miles
Used deals Limited stock

Underneath the Hyundai Kona Electric are the same batteries and motor that power the Kia e-Niro, so your choice between the two cars is mainly down to design and practicality (the Kona is slightly smaller).

The Kona comes in a choice of Premium and top-spec Premium SE trims and with Hyundai’s usual five-year warranty plus five free annual health checks. There's also a choice of two battery packs - the most expensive 64kWh version delivers the impressive 279 mile range figure. A cheaper 39kWh model costs less, but offers a reduced range of around 150 miles on a single charge.

HYUNDAI KONA ELECTRIC BUYERS' GUIDE

4. Volkswagen ID.3

Volkswagen ID.3 front three quarters view

Official range 263 miles
Used deals from £35,991
Monthly finance from £546*

While Volkswagen had already been selling electric versions of the Golf (e-Golf) and Up (e-Up), the ID.3 was the company's first attempt at an electric-only car. Put simply, this means rather than fitting batteries and motors where engines and fuel tanks traditionally go, VW was able to package the car's components more smartly, resulting in a spacious interior. There are three battery options - avoid Pure as these come with a range of around 150 miles, and instead look for Pro or Pro Performance, which can achieve 200 miles in the real world. Pro S models come with an even larger 77kWh battery pack for over 300 miles, but only have space for four, not five.

Whichever model you go for, you'll get a heated steering wheel, heated seats, adaptive cruise control, interior ambient lighting and LED headlights, so even entry-level Life should be enough.

VOLKSWAGEN ID.3 BUYERS' GUIDE

5. Tesla Model S/Model X

Model S official range 405 miles
Model X official range 348 miles
Used Model S deals from £33,989
Monthly Model S finance from £0*
Used Model X deals Limited stock

An official range of more than 400 miles with the biggest battery pack suggests that the Tesla Model S could drive between Edinburgh and London without needing to be charged. In reality, you'd need to stop somewhere along the route, as the car's realistic range is more like 320 miles, which is still far in excess of the alternative models on this page.

The large discrepancy is down to the way that the Tesla has been tested - under an older laboratory test that was recently replaced to make results more accurate.

If you're in need of a seven-seater SUV but prefer electric power, the Model X shares many of its parts with the Model S, but adds those all-important rear seats. 

6. Jaguar I-Pace

Official range 292 miles
Used deals from £38,800
Monthly finance from £726*

It may be Jaguar’s first electric car but the I-Pace sets the standard for electric SUVs with an impressive range along with decent space and sporty performance. It’s not cheap but is a credible alternative to other models in Jaguar’s line-up, especially if you can charge it at home and work.

JAGUAR I-PACE BUYERS' GUIDE

7. Mercedes EQC

Official range 280 miles
Used deals from £56,780
Monthly finance from £1,024*

The EQC was Mercedes' first electric car under the new 'EQ' branding - since then we have seen the smaller EQA and EQB, as well as the EQV van-based MPV and EQS saloon. Strong performance (it can do 0-62mph in 5.1 seconds) is one of its hallmarks. It also has Mercedes' latest advanced dashboard software that's tailored to electric car drivers. So you can benefit from crisp sat-nav directions that route you past a charging station when required. Thanks to it 500-litre boot and genuine five-seat interior, practicality is another plus point.

MERCEDES EQC BUYERS' GUIDE

8. Audi e-tron

Official range 249 miles
Used deals from £45,000
Monthly finance from £745*

The e-tron is Audi’s first electric car but it’s an impressive effort if it’s real-world range is anything to go by. Naturally, it’s expensive (it’s a rival to the Jaguar I-Pace) but your money buys all the traditional Audi virtues you would expect, chief among them being lots of technology, striking looks, great build quality and a sophisticated driving experience. There are Sportback versions with sloping rooflines, and sporty S versions too. For the ultimate in high-tech, search for a model with optional side cameras in place of traditional wing mirrors.

AUDI E-TRON BUYERS' GUIDE

*Representative PCP finance - Ford Fiesta:

48 monthly payments of £192
Deposit: £0
Mileage limit: 8,000 per year
Optional final payment to buy car: £2,923
Total amount payable to buy car: £11,926
Total cost of credit: £2,426
Amount borrowed: £9,500
APR: 9.9%

BuyaCar is a credit broker, not a lender. Our rates start from 6.9% APR. The rate you are offered will depend on your individual circumstances.

 

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